Philosateleia
Kevin Blackston
PO Box 17544
San Antonio TX 78217-0544
United States of America

Philosateleian Blog

Welcoming Princess Hadassah

If you don’t subscribe to the Philosateleian Post Horn, you may have missed the news that my wife and I recently welcomed our first child, a little girl we’ve named Hadassah. We’re very excited to have her here, and there’s already a Philosateleian Post stamp commemorating her birth. Here’s one of the first day covers mailed on October 22.

H.R.H. Princess Hadassah first day cover
H.R.H. Princess Hadassah FDC

If you have children, you no doubt understand that the past few weeks have been absolutely packed for us as we’ve begun adjusting to having a little one to take care of. We’re still alive and well, though, and I plan to add some new material to Philosateleia as time permits.

Fall 2014 update for The Philosateleian

For fans of The Philosateleian U.S. Stamp Album, I have some great news this morning: the Fall 2014 Supplement (190 KB, 4 files, 9 pages) is now available!

The USPS seems to have scheduled fewer new issues over the past three months than was the case earlier this year, which gives us collectors a bit of a breather. Still, with some updates to past series, there are several pages in this supplement that you’ll want to be sure to update.

Enjoy!

Diamond-shaped Philosateleian Post stamp planned for this fall

As the weekend draws to a close, I have a bit of a teaser for you, dear reader. Philosateleian Post will release its first ever diamond-shaped local post stamp this fall, most likely in October or early November.

The new stamp’s design has not yet been finalized, and I haven’t formally announced what’s being commemorated, but here’s a sneak peek at the frame:

Pink diamond-shaped Philosateleian Post stamp
Diamond-shaped Philosateleian Post stamp

You are, of course, welcome to speculate on what this all means. If you would like to receive a copy of the new stamp when it’s available, just send a self-addressed stamped envelope to the address listed on my contact page.

New Purgatory Post stamp commemorates Panama Canal centennial

I checked my post office box yesterday, and inside was a cover bearing a copy of the latest local post stamp from Scott A.’s Purgatory Post:

Purgatory Post Panama Canal Centennial stamp picturing SS Ancon in the Culebra Cut
Purgatory Post Panama Canal Centennial stamp

The stamp, which celebrates the centennial of the opening of the Panama Canal, depicts the SS Ancon, which on August 15, 1914—exactly 100 years ago today—became the first ship to officially pass through the canal. (According to Wikipedia, two other vessels had actually already made the trip through Central America, but the Ancon gets credit for it.)

The frame of Scott’s new stamp makes me think of some of the United States commemoratives from the late 1900s on up until the mid 1920s, with big, solid labels accentuated by scroll work on the sides. I’m happy to add this one to my collection.

Searching for one last Star-Spangled Banner

Have you ever noticed how, when there are several different varieties of a particular stamp, you might end up with multiple copies of all but one variety, and that last one is all but impossible to find even though it’s theoretically very common?

Such is the case with this year’s Star-Spangled Banner stamps. I have glassines stuffed full of the stamps die cut 9.4 vert. or 11.2×10.8. I even have a couple of singles from the ATM booklets. But for whatever reason, the booklet single with “USPS” in the fireworks above the flagpole continues to evade me. I’m sure it will turn up and some point, and when it does, I’ll work up a post on how to identify the different varieties.

Are there any common definitives issued in the last couple of years that should be easy to find used but that you haven’t yet managed to acquire?

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