Philosateleia
Kevin Blackston
PO Box 217
Floresville TX 78114-0217
United States of America

Philosateleian Blog

Happy Holidays cancellation results in humorous visual

Last week, I received an envelope in the mail with several older commemorative stamps on it. Of itself, this is not that unusual; a lot of collectors use surplus mint stamps from decades ago on their outbound mail. I’m working through using up a stash of such material myself. I get it.

What was kind of unusual was the placement of the “Happy Holidays” cancellation on the 1952 stamp honoring the 4-H Clubs. It looks like the elf in the cancellation just pegged the boy on the stamp in the face with a snowball!

3¢ United States stamp honoring The 4-H Clubs with “Happy Holidays” cancellation
Snowball fight on a 3¢ 4-H Clubs stamp

The kid doesn’t seem too upset about getting clobbered, so maybe a snowball fight is about to begin. Either way, this struck me as pretty humorous.

Purgatory Post issues Artemis 1 local post stamps

Purgatory Post on January 4, 2023, kicked off the calendar year by issuing a pair of 1-sola stamps commemorating Artemis 1. The mission that ran from November 16–December 11, 2022, saw an uncrewed spacecraft launched, placed into orbit around the Moon, and successfully returned to Earth.

Pair of 1-sola Purgatory Post stamps picturing Artemis 1 spacecraft, Moon and Earth, and Artemis 1 mission patch
Purgatory Post 1-sola Artemis 1 stamps

One of the New Hampshire-based local post’s stamps features a view of part of the spacecraft looking back toward Earth as well as its launch from Kennedy Space Center, while the other has a view of the Moon’s surface with Earth in the distance plus the Artemis 1 mission patch.

The goal of the Artemis program is to eventually return humans to the Moon’s surface. As of this writing, the first crewed Artemis mission is scheduled for next year with a lunar landing to take place in 2025.

Feeding America sends first decorative BRE of 2023

The first decorative business reply envelope of the year to arrive in my mailbox was from Feeding America, an organization that supports food banks and other food assistance programs throughout the United States. The envelope is not Feeding America’s first BRE with a preprinted stamp-sized design, but it’s the smallest envelope I’ve seen from the nonprofit to this point.

Feeding America business reply envelope bearing stamp-sized design picturing fruit
Feeding America business reply envelope bearing stamp-sized design picturing fruit

At first, I thought the artwork used for the faux “stamp” was a repeat from an envelope I received from Feeding America in April 2022, but no, it’s not. While the designs are similar—two pieces of fruit with a stem and leaves—they are most certainly different.

I haven’t received a huge number of nonprofit mailings since the start of the year, but that is not all that unusual; it typically takes a couple of weeks for the inbound flow to reach normal levels following the holiday season. No doubt we’ll see more of this sort of thing as the year progresses.

American Indian rides solo on Cheyenne Agency cover

The latest addition to my collection of 14¢ American Indian stamps on cover is just as philatelic as they come, but it’s still a pretty nifty piece.

The cover postmarked at Cheyenne Agency, South Dakota, on October 1, 1934, bears a cachet commemorating the 130th anniversary of the Lewis and Clark Expedition’s arrival in that area in 1804.

Front of cover bearing 14-cent American Indian stamp and Lewis & Clark Expedition/Cheyenne River cachet
14¢ American Indian cover with Lewis & Clark Expedition/Cheyenne River cachet

The highlight for me is the solo usage of the American Indian stamp. It’s totally philatelic—even with the “Via Air Mail” notation on the front of the cover, the amount of postage owed was only 6¢, meaning the stamp represents an 8¢ overpayment—but there is something of a connection between the subject of the stamp, Hollow Horn Bear, and Cheyenne Agency.

Cheyenne Agency was set apart in the 19th century as land for the Lakota nation. As a Brule Sioux, Hollow Horn Bear was a Lakota, and although he lived at South Dakota’s Rosebud Agency, he no doubt would have had at least distant relatives at Cheyenne Agency during his lifetime. Pretty cool stuff!

More details about PSCS Local Post

I wrote a few weeks ago about the Philippine Stamp Collectors’ Society’s new PSCS Local Post, which began operating late last year. Since that time, I’ve learned some additional details about the operation.

Renato L. shares that Manila Local Post in the Philippines began operating on October 27, 2022, using provisional stamps denominated in pesos, while his own San Diego Local Post launched November 24, 2022, using provisional stamps denominated 60¢. Both of those concerns as well as an additional planned Angeles City Local Post are operating under the umbrella of PSCS Local Post.

The latest mailing I’ve received bears a large San Diego Local Post/PSCS Local Post seal or stamp on its front, and a strip of six Manila Local Post 1-peso stamps featuring the Rizal Monument in Manila, Philippines, on the reverse.

San Diego Local Post/PSCS Local Post seal on large cover
San Diego Local Post/PSCS Local Post seal on cover
Strip of six Manila Local Post 1-peso Rizal Monument stamps on reverse of cover
Strip of six Manila Local Post 1-peso Rizal Monument stamps on cover

As a longtime local poster myself, I’m always happy to see other people getting involved in this particular slice of stamp collecting, and I think it’s pretty neat that a society not dedicated to local post collecting specifically is encouraging such activities.

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