Philosateleia
Kevin Blackston
PO Box 17544
San Antonio TX 78217-0544
United States of America

Philosateleian Blog

Red-shouldered hawk stamp press release

A couple of weeks ago, I shared a sneak preview of Philosateleian Post’s new red-shouldered hawk stamp. Now, finally, the “official” press release about the stamp is available.

Red-shouldered hawk stamp
Red-shouldered hawk

I plan to begin using this stamp on July 1. If you want a copy, see the press release for instructions on how to request one.

The red-shouldered hawk stamp is Philosateleian Post’s 25th different stamp design. I’m a little surprised I’ve made that many different stamps, especially considering that I’ve never produced more than three different designs in a single year. Although 25 is just a number, it does feel like a bit of a milestone.

Sneak preview: red-shouldered hawk local post stamp

The details are still being finalized, but I thought you might like to see Philosateleian Post’s newest stamp, which pictures a red-shouldered hawk.

Red-shouldered Hawk stamp
Red-shouldered Hawk stamp

Planned date of issue for this stamp is July 1. I’ll post more here soon.

Purgatory Post turns to pounce wheel

New Hampshire’s Purgatory Post recently issued the latest in its series of stamps picturing covered bridges in the Granite State. The new 25¢ stamp pictures the Carleton bridge, which is located in Swanzey, New Hampshire. Scott A., who operates Purgatory Post, was kind enough to send some samples of his new stamp to me.

Purgatory Post Carleton cover
Purgatory Post Carleton cover
Purgatory Post Carleton stamp
Purgatory Post Carleton stamp

The stamp is noteworthy for a couple of reasons. First, it's the 160th issue produced by Purgatory Post. Congratulations, Scott! Second, this is the first stamp that Scott has perforated with a pounce wheel or tracing wheel. The tool, which is more commonly used in sewing, produces a neat row of tiny holes; the results are most obvious along the left edge of the stamp pictured above.

Scott's solution looks to be on par with paper cutters that have so-called “perforating wheels” that produce a roulette-like separation. The results may not be perfect, but they are still attractive and quite sufficient.

Stamp album page for Vintage Circus Posters souvenir sheet

If you got hold of one of the United States’ vintage circus poster souvenir sheets, and didn’t have to pay an arm and a leg for it, consider yourself lucky. The die cut versions of the controversial product were made available only in the U.S. Postal Service’s 2014 yearbook, while the variety without die cutting was available only in press sheet form, and sold out before the product was ever officially announced through USA Philatelic.

Due to the highly unusual nature of the souvenir sheet—one version available only in the yearbook, and the other available only as part of a press sheet—it’s not something that really fits into my collection, and I’ve chosen not to include a space for it in The Philosateleian U.S. Stamp Album. When David W. wrote to ask about it, however, I thought, why not offer a standalone page for those who do choose to collect it? So that’s what I’ve done.

You can download the special page from The Philosateleian’s extras section. It’s not something that will be included with the main album download, but it’s there if you need it for the circus poster souvenir sheet.

Free books!

In the course of doing some spring cleaning this year, I ran across a couple of stamp collecting books that, although helpful to me when I was younger, I haven’t referenced in quite some time. I no longer have a use for them, so I’m giving them away!

The books are Stamp Collecting: The Complete, Easy Guide to the World’s Most Popular Hobby by Charles Adams and H.E. Harris & Company’s How to Collect Stamps. As the titles may suggest, these volumes are geared toward the beginning collector, giving suggestions on how to build a collection and defining plenty of terms that are specific to philately.

Two stamp collecting books on desk
Stamp collecting books

If you’ve just finished putting together a specialized exhibit on Peruvian airmail stamps, these probably are not the books for you, but if you’re still finding your philatelic footing, you might find them useful. If you’re interested, leave a comment below to identify which book you want, then contact me via email so I have your mailing address.

Update: both books have been claimed, and I’ll be preparing them for shipment to the recipients. Thank you for your interest!

  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
  5. 5
  6. 6
  7. 7
  8. 8
  9. 9
  10. 10
  11. 11
  12. 12
  13. 13
  14. 14
  15. 15
  16. 16
  17. 17
  18. 18
  19. 19
  20. 20
  21. 21
  22. 22
  23. 23
  24. 24
  25. 25
  26. 26
  27. 27
  28. 29
  29. 31
  30. 32
  31. 33
  32. 34
  33. 35
  34. 36
  35. 37
  36. 38
  37. 39
  38. 40
  39. 41
  40. 42
  41. 43
  42. 44
  43. 45
  44. 46
  45. 47
  46. 48
  47. 49
  48. 50
  49. 51
  50. 52
  51. 53
  52. 54
  53. 55
  54. 56
  55. 57
  56. 58
  57. 59
  58. 60
  59. 61
  60. 62
  61. 63
  62. 64
  63. 65
  64. 66
  65. 67
  66. 68
  67. 69
  68. 70
  69. 71
  70. 72
  71. 73