Philosateleia
Kevin Blackston
PO Box 217
Floresville TX 78114-0217
United States of America

Philosateleian Blog

12+ years and 500 blog posts about stamp collecting

On June 23, 2009, I made my first Philosateleian blog entry. In it, I wrote that I planned “to write about stamps, stamp collecting, and the mail in general.”

Over the past 12+ years, I’ve done that, and I realized recently that this would be my 500th blog post. That averages out to well under one post per week, so I can’t claim to have been a particularly frequent poster, but 500 entries? That’s a milestone that I never even thought about way back when.

And 12+ years—a lot has happened in that time span. In terms of stamp collecting, I’ve become much more focused in my collecting interests. I have a couple of tubs of unprocessed stamps and covers that I pick at as time allows, but I rarely buy much of anything for my collection these days unless it’s a 14¢ American Indian stamp on cover. I bought my first perforating machine, and later my second, so that I could improve the looks of my Philosateleian Post local post stamps, and my appreciation for a well-designed, well-perforated stamp has only grown as I’ve dabbled in that myself.

Of much greater importance, I’ve gotten married, had a baby, moved halfway across the country for a new job, then gone back to work for my former employer. My family and I have visited Yosemite and Disney World and the Great Smoky Mountains. I have to say that God has given me more than a fair shake in life.

There has been stress and sorrow, too. Losing Grandma. Saying goodbye to Granddaddy…and then to my mom. Those are the hard times, but we keep moving.

So, will I make it to blog post #1000 in the year 2033? None of us even knows, really knows, what’s coming up 12 minutes from now, much less 12 years from now, but I do intend to keep writing, hopefully informing and entertaining you along the way, and as always, I appreciate your readership.

Philosateleian Post Tenaya Lake FDC arrives unscathed

On October 1, I mailed first day covers bearing Philosateleian Post’s newest stamp, which pictures Tenaya Lake in Yosemite National Park. I sent one of those to myself, and it was awaiting when I checked my post office box on Friday.

Somewhat to my surprise, the cover was processed without incurring serious damage. Even more surprising is that the local post stamp I applied to the cover survived completely unscathed!

Philosateleian Post Tenaya Lake first day cover
Philosateleian Post Tenaya Lake first day cover

I’m accustomed to the United States Postal Service’s processing equipment scraping the surface of my stamps, sometimes leaving little scrolls of paper barely attached, so to receive a cover with one of my stamps intact is a delightful treat. If only everything that I mail reached its destination in this condition!

New Hampshire’s Corbin Bridge pictured on Purgatory Post stamp

On September 7, 2021, Purgatory Post issued the latest in its long-running series of stamps picturing New Hampshire’s covered bridges. The 17-sola stamp features a view of the Corbin Bridge spanning the Croydon Branch of the Sugar River near Newport Village, New Hampshire.

17-sola Purgatory Post stamp picturing Corbin Bridge
Purgatory Post Corbin Bridge stamp

The bridge, which is just over 96 feet long, is of relatively new construction. The original bridge at the location, which was built in either 1835 or 1845—Purgatory Post operator Scott A. tells me that sources disagree on the exact date, though his stamp uses the earlier—was destroyed by a 1993 fire. The replacement which stands today was built in 1994.

14¢ American Indian solo usage on cover to Austria

Prior to December 2020, I had never seen an example of the 14¢ American Indian stamp used by itself to pay postage on a letter mailed to Europe. That month, however, I acquired an example mailed from Honolulu to Germany in 1935, and I’m excited to now have another example mailed from California to Austria, which by that point had been annexed by Nazi Germany, in 1938.

Front of cover bearing 14-cent American Indian stamp
14¢ American Indian cover mailed from Los Angeles, California, to Vienna, Austria, Germany

In the case of the earlier cover from 1935, 8¢ postage covered air mail within the United States plus surface transportation to Europe for a one-ounce letter, with the other 6¢ covering a 3¢ per half ounce surcharge for air mail service within Europe. This newer cover, however, is an example of 5¢ postage covering standard transportation for a one-ounce letter and 3¢ covering a surcharge for air mail service within the United States, with the remaining 6¢ once again covering the 3¢ per half ounce surcharge for air mail service within Europe.

In both cases, the amount of postage due was the same—14¢—but from a postal history perspective, my newest acquisition technically represents a different set of rates.

Fall 2021 update for The Philosateleian

We’re closing in on the end of summer here in the Northern Hemisphere, and it’s time to update our stamp albums once again. The Fall 2021 Supplement (1.27 MB, 8 files, 21 pages) for The Philosateleian U.S. Stamp Album is ready for you to download and print at your convenience.

This update includes spaces for all regular United States postage stamps issued over the past three months, this year’s federal “duck” stamp, and silver tax stamps from the 1930s and 1940s, so there’s a ltitle something for everyone, postage and revenue stamp collectors alike.

Thank you as always for your feedback and support, and happy collecting!

  1. 1
  2. 2
  3. 3
  4. 4
  5. 5
  6. 6
  7. 7
  8. 8
  9. 9
  10. 10
  11. 11
  12. 12
  13. 13
  14. 14
  15. 15
  16. 16
  17. 17
  18. 18
  19. 19
  20. 20
  21. 21
  22. 22
  23. 23
  24. 24
  25. 25
  26. 26
  27. 27
  28. 28
  29. 29
  30. 30
  31. 31
  32. 32
  33. 34
  34. 36
  35. 37
  36. 38
  37. 39
  38. 40
  39. 41
  40. 42
  41. 43
  42. 44
  43. 45
  44. 46
  45. 47
  46. 48
  47. 49
  48. 50
  49. 51
  50. 52
  51. 53
  52. 54
  53. 55
  54. 56
  55. 57
  56. 58
  57. 59
  58. 60
  59. 61
  60. 62
  61. 63
  62. 64
  63. 65
  64. 66
  65. 67
  66. 68
  67. 69
  68. 70
  69. 71
  70. 72
  71. 73
  72. 74
  73. 75
  74. 76
  75. 77
  76. 78
  77. 79
  78. 80
  79. 81
  80. 82
  81. 83
  82. 84
  83. 85
  84. 86
  85. 87
  86. 88
  87. 89
  88. 90
  89. 91
  90. 92
  91. 93
  92. 94
  93. 95
  94. 96
  95. 97
  96. 98
  97. 99
  98. 100
  99. 101
  100. 102
  101. 103
  102. 104
  103. 105
  104. 106
  105. 107
  106. 108
  107. 109
  108. 110
  109. 111
  110. 112
  111. 113
  112. 114
  113. 115
  114. 116
  115. 117
  116. 118
  117. 119
  118. 120
  119. 121
  120. 122
  121. 123
  122. 124
  123. 125
  124. 126
  125. 127
  126. 128
  127. 129
  128. 130
  129. 131
  130. 132
  131. 133